Wheaton College Color Logo

Faculty Profiles

Doug Yeo Faculty Profile Pic

Douglas Yeo

Guest Lecturer (Trombone)

On Faculty since 2019




Recognized worldwide as a leading low brass performer, teacher, scholar, and author, Douglas Yeo was bass trombonist of the Boston Symphony from 1985-2012. Before coming to Boston, he was a member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, a free-lance musician in New York City, and a high school band director. From 2012-2016 he served as Professor of Trombone at Arizona State University and has also been on the faculties of New England Conservatory of Music, Boston University, and the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University. He received his Bachelor of Music degree cum laude from Wheaton College, Illinois (1976)—where he studied trombone with Edward Kleinhammer (Bass Trombonist of the Chicago Symphony, 1940-1985)—and his master’s degree from New York University (1979)—where he was the graduate teaching assistant for the NYU Band. He was appointed to the Wheaton College Conservatory of Music faculty in 2019.

In 2014, Douglas Yeo was the recipient of the International Trombone Association’s highest honor, the ITA Award, given to him “in recognition of his distinguished career and in acknowledgement of his impact on the world of trombone performance.” He has written dozens of book chapters and articles for many publications and is the author of The One Hundred: Essential Works for the Symphonic Bass Trombonist (Encore Music Publishers) and co-author (with Edward Kleinhammer) of Mastering the Trombone (Ensemble Publications). His most recently published book is Serpents, Bass Horns and Ophicleides at the Bate Collection (Oxford University Press). Presently, he is at work on books to be published by University of Illinois Press, Oxford University Press, and Rowman & Littlefield. International Music, G. Schirmer, Southern Music, De Haske Music, and Sarastro Music publish his many arrangements of music for trombones and other wind instruments. His instructional DVD and eight solo recordings—which include Proclamation, recorded with Britain’s Black Dyke Band, Cornerstone, an album of devotional solos with Scripture readings by Bill Pearce, and Fratres, a recording of bass trombone duets with Gerry Pagano, bass trombonist of the Saint Louis Symphony—have received critical acclaim. He is also the scriptwriter and on-air host of Arizona Encore, a radio program produced by Classical Arizona PBS and broadcast weekly on KBAQ-FM, Phoenix, and is in demand as a performer on historical instrument including serpent, ophicleide, and bass sackbut with both period instrument and modern orchestras.

As a teacher, Douglas Yeo has given master classes and recitals on five continents and has held residencies around the world including the International Trombone Festival (six times), the Banff Center (Canada), the Hamamatsu International Wind Instrument Academy and Festival (eight times) and the Nagoya Trombone Festival (Japan), the International Trombone and Tuba Festival (Beijing), and the Dutch Bass Trombone Open (Holland). From 1998-2008 he was music director of the New England Brass Band, leading the band to two North American Brass Band Association Championship titles in its section and recording five CDs in Symphony Hall, Boston. These included The Light of the World, and Be Glad Then, America, which was named the 2007 NABBA recording of the year. With the Arizona State University Desert Bones Trombone Choir, he recorded two albums, including Of Grandeur, Grace, and Glory, the first recording ever made at ASU by an instrumental studio ensemble. As a guest conductor and clinician with bands and orchestras around the world, he has worked with dozens of high school, collegiate, and professional groups. Recently, he was conductor of the North Carolina Christian School Association All State Honor Band, and conducted the University of Washington Wind Ensemble and Concert Band in concert. His website was the first site on the Internet devoted to the trombone (1996), and his blogOccasional thoughts on Life, Faith, and the Trombone—was launched in 2016. Douglas Yeo is an International YAMAHA Performing artist and has worked closely with YAMAHA in the design of the YAMAHA YBL822G bass trombone and mouthpiece that he plays.

New York University
M.A., music performance (trombone), 1979

Wheaton College (Illinois)
B.M. cum laude, music performance (trombone), 1976

Indiana University
1973-74

The Integration of Faith and Learning in the Wheaton College Trombone Studio: Stewardship, Excellence, and Mission 

Douglas Yeo

In the Wheaton College Trombone Studio, faith and learning are inexorably integrated to stimulate thinking, conversation, and action to equip students to contend For Christ and His Kingdom as artists/musicians/trombonists. To this end, three words inform our engagement with all of our artistic pursuits, from lessons, to studying, to practicing, to rehearsals, and to performances and cultural engagement: stewardship, excellence, and mission.

Stewardship

This is the why of what we do. If the Christian can allow that there is such a thing as righteous covetousness, it is that we long to hear, at the end of our life on earth, the words that Christ said in the parable of the talents, “Well done, good and faithful servant” (Matthew 25:14-30). Yet we are well to note that these words were not said to those who had simply done good works. Rather, they were said to those who had been good stewards of the talents God had given to them. Each person is gifted in unique ways; gifting is not a one-size-fits-all enterprise. For each of us, passionate stewardship of the gifts God has given us is at the root of our artistic personhood, and we strive diligently and joyfully to return to Him the fruits of the investment He has made in us.

Excellence

This is the how of what we do. Excellence was modeled at creation. The created order—made for purpose and fully harmonious and beautiful—was pronounced good, and after the creation of Adam and Eve, it was pronounced very good (Genesis 1:1-2:1). The Psalmist declared that “splendor and majesty are before Him; strength and beauty are in His sanctuary” (Psalm 96:6). The creative work of God in Three Persons is rooted in excellence, and the Trinity self-defines excellence and goodness by virtue of its existence. “God,” in the words of Wheaton College President Dr. Philip Ryken, “has high aesthetic standards for goodness, truth, and beauty, and whose glory is art’s highest goal.” (Art for God’s Sake, P&R Publishing, 2006). All re-creative acts of humankind are to model the commitment to excellence that was evident from the beginning of time. As Dr. Harold M. Best (Dean, Wheaton College Conservatory of Music, 1970-1997) wrote in his landmark book, Music Through the Eyes of Faith (Harper Collins, 1993), “excellence is the norm of stewardship.” As artists, we are committed to the ongoing pursuit of excellence as we relentlessly express our stewardship of the talents He has given to us.

Mission

This is what we desire to accomplish through what we do. The life of the Christian revolves minute-by-minute around the three great commandments: 1) Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, strength, and mind (Deuteronomy 6:4, Luke 10:27), 2) Love your neighbor as yourself (Matthew 19:19), and 3) Go into all the world, make disciples, baptize them, and teach them to observe all that has Christ commanded us (Matthew 28:19-20). With trombones in our hands, we bring our artistic gifting to a fallen world and we glorify God, thereby reflecting the beauty of creation and the redemptive work of Christ. Dr. Ryken reminds us, in Art for God’s Sake, that “because [the Christian] works with the materials of creation, the artistry itself is capable of conveying the artist’s commitment to a good, loving, and gracious Creator.” When this commitment is made evident through our stewardship, excellence, and missional work, the Spirit graciously prompts the hearts and minds of men and women to desire to understand its root. From there, our ongoing obedience to the great commandments leads to our engaging the world with God’s Truth For Christ and His Kingdom.

Books and book chapters

Book: Serpents, Bass Horns, and Ophicleides at the Bate Collection (Oxford University). Oxford University Press, 2019. 

Book: The One Hundred: Essential Works for the Symphonic Bass Trombonist, Encore Music Publishers, 2017.

Book: Edward Kleinhammer and Douglas Yeo, Mastering the Trombone, 1997. Ensemble Publications (fourth edition), 2012.

Book: The Trombone: First Lessons. Unit B3d of Module 3 (Brass Teaching andLearning), curriculum for The University of Reading (England) School of Education Music Teaching in Professional Practice Initiative, 2001.

Book chapter: Marches and Divertimenti: Haydn and the Serpent. Monica Lustig, editor, Der Zink – Geschichte, Instrumente und Bauweise. Michaelsteiner Konferenzberichte Band 79, 2015.

Book chapters: The Serpent in England: Evolution and Design, and The Serpent in England, Context, Decline and Revival.  Florence Gétreau, editor, Le serpent: itinéaires passés et présents. CNRS Editions, 2013.

Book chapter: Playing Historical Instruments: With the Right Tool, You Can Do Any Job. Ken Amis, editor, The Brass Player’s Cookbook: Creative Recipes for a Successful Performance. Meredith Music Publications, 2006.

Book chapter: Approaching the Trombone. Mark Johnson, editor, The Instrumental Resource for Church and School. Church Street Press, 2002.

Book chapter and DVD: Utley Collection Serpents and recorded performance. Sabine K. Klaus, Trumpets and Other High Brass: A History inspired by the Joe R. and Joella F. Utley Collection.  Volume 2: Ways to Expand the Harmonic Series. National Music Museum, Vermillion, South Dakota, 2013

Dictionary entry: Serpent. Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, Second edition. Oxford University Press, 2014.

Dictionary Entry: Buccin. Grove Dictionary of Musical Instruments, Second edition. Oxford University Press, 2014.

Selected articles

Keith Brown: Renaissance Man. International Trombone Association Journal, Vol. 47, No. 3, July 2019. 

Take It, Big Chief: An Appreciation of Russell Moore. International Trombone Association Journal, Vol. 45, No. 3, July 2017. 

Climbing the Mountain of Life. Encore Music Publishers, 2017. 

Tuba mirum or Tuba Dirum: Mozart’s Requiem and the trombone. Boston Symphony Orchestra Program Book, Week 23, April 20-22, 2017.

Old Strains Reawakened: The Boston Symphony’s Historical Instrument CollectionBoston Symphony Orchestra Program Book, Week 16, February 16-21, 2017.

Under the Radar Part 2, Overlooked Passages for Bass Trombone. International Trombone Association Journal, Vol. 45, No. 1, January 2017.

Homer Rodeheaver: Reverend Trombone. Historic Brass Society Journal. Vol. 27, 2015. 

Evolution: The Double-Valve Bass Trombone. International Trombone Association Journal, Vol. 23, No. 3, July 2015.

Edward Kleinhammer: A Life and Legacy Remembered. International Trombone Association Journal, Vol. 42, No. 2, April 2014.

Serpents in Boston: The Museum of Fine Arts and Boston Symphony Orchestra Collections. Galpin Society Journal, Volume LXV, March 2012.

Untangling Bass Trombone Valves and Tuning, The Trombonist, Spring 2012.

A Good Old Note: The Serpent in Thomas Hardy’s World and WorksThe Hardy Review (Journal of the Thomas Hardy Association), Volume XIII, Number 1, Spring 2011.

The Contrabass TromboneThe Brass Herald, Issue 13, May-July 2006.

Some Clarity about the Cimbasso. The Brass Herald, Issue 11, December 2005-January 2006.

The Buccin: A Trombone With a Serious Bite. The Brass Herald, Issue 8, May-July 2005.

Haydn’s CreationInternational Trombone Association Journal, Volume 33, Number 2, April 2005.

Serpentists in Charles Wild’s Choir of the Cathedral of Amiens, c. 1826. Historic Brass Society Journal, Volume 13, 2001.

Necrology: A Tribute to Robert King (1914-1999). Historic Brass Society Newsletter, 2000.

Trumpet Players of the Boston Symphony, 1881-1990, International Trumpet Guild Journal, Volume 15, Number 2, December 1990.

Horn Players of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 1881-1988, The Horn Call, Volume XVIII, Number 2, April 1988.

Tuba Players of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 1913-1987, T.U.B.A. Journal, Volume 14, Number 4, May 1987.

A Pictorial History of Low Brass Players in the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 1887-1986, International Trombone Association Journal, Volume XIV, Number 4, Fall 1986.

 

Solo and chamber music recordings 

FRATRES with Gerry Pagano, bass trombone, Michael Lake, alto trombone (2017).

Table for Three with John Ericson, horn, Deanna Swoboda, tuba, Summit Records DVD 642 (2015).

Approaching the Serpent: An Historical and Pedagogical Overview (DVD). Berlioz Historical Brass DVD101 (2010).

The Essential Rochut. Belle CD 010108 (2008).

Le Monde du Serpent with Gloriae Dei Cantores, Berlioz Historical Brass, members of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Berlioz Historical Brass BHB CD101 (2003). 

Bridgewater Hall Live 2002 with Fodens Band (Russell Gray, conductor). Egon SFZ110 (2002) 

Two of a Mind with Nick Hudson, trombone, Williams Fairey Band (Thomas Wyss, conductor), David Chapman, piano. Egon SFZ107 (2001).

Cornerstone with Stephen Gerber, Wes Ross, Beatrice Bush Bixler, Patricia Yeo, piano, readings by Bill Pearce. Die letzte Posaune 83175 (2000).

Take 1 with Wheaton College Concert Band (Arthur Katterjohn, conductor), Tokyo Artists Ensemble (Yoshiyuki Yamagishi, conductor), Frequency Band Orchestra (Norman Bolter, conductor). Die letzte Posaune 51955 (1998).

Proclamation with Black Dyke Mills Band (James Watson, conductor), Ronald Barron, trombone, Patricia Yeo, piano.  Doyen/Die letzte Posaune 055 (1996).

Recordings as a conductor

It’s Beginning To Look A Lot Like Christmas. Arizona State University Desert Bones Trombone Choir (2015).

Of Grandeur, Grace & Glory. Arizona State University Desert Bones Trombone Choir (2014) 

Be Glad Then America, The New England Brass Band, NEBB CD105 (2007).

This is Christmas, The New England Brass Band, NEBB CD104 (2005).

The Light of the World, The New England Brass Band. NEBB CD103 (2004).

Honour and Glory, The New England Brass Band. NEBBCD102        (2001).

Christmas Joy!, The New England Brass Band. NEBBCD101 (1999).

Orchestral recordings

Over forty recordings as bass trombonist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1985-2012) and Baltimore Symphony (1981-1985) with conductors Seiji Ozawa, Bernard Haitink, James Levine, Sergiu Comissiona, John Williams (soundtracks to Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan), Leonard Bernstein, Vladimer Ashkenazy, and Andre Previn.

Over thirty-five recordings with the Boston Pops Orchestra (1985-2012) with conductors John Williams, Keith Lockhart, and Leonard Bernstein.

 

Selected masterclasses and performances

2019: Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts, Duke Divinity School, Durham, North Carolina (New Caritas Orchestra performance; Jeremy Begbie)

2019: Hamamatsu, Japan (Teaching, performance: 25th Hamamatsu International Wind Instrument Academy and Festival)

2019: Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois — Guest conductor, Wheaton College Symphonic Band

2019: Del Mar College, Corpus Christi, Texas — South Texas Brass Festival (Guest artist;   recital, masterclass)

2018: University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa — International Trombone Festival (audio/visual presentation: A Native American in Jazz: The Recorded Legacy of Russell “Big Chief Moore)

2018: Nagoya Trombone Festival, Nagoya, Japan (Guest artist; solo performance, masterclass, lecture, conductor)

2018: University of Texas, Arlington (three master classes)

2018: Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas (Guest artist at annual TCU Trombone Summit; solo performance, masterclass)

2018: University of Texas, Austin (Performance with trombone choir, masterclass, conducting)

2018: University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (conducting University of Washington Wind Ensemble and Symphonic Band; clinician: Pacific Northwest Band Festival)

2017: Symphony Hall, Phoenix, Arizona (Performances with Phoenix Symphony)

2017: Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa (Master class)

2017: Northwest Iowa Symphony, Sioux Center, Iowa (Concerto performance)

2017: Northbrook Symphony, Northbrook, Illinois (Orchestra performance, Mendelssohn Symphony No. 5, serpent)

2017: Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts, Duke Divinity School, Durham, North Carolina (New Caritas Orchestra performance; Jeremy Begbie)

2017: New York University, New York, New York – Historic Brass Society Symposium, (Solo performance/world premiere on serpent)

2017: University of Redlands, Redlands, California – International Trombone Festival (Master class: The One Hundred: Effective Strategies for Successful Audition Preparation)

2017: University of Redlands, Redlands, California – International Trombone Festival (Duet performances with James Markey, Gerry Pagano, Megumi Kanda)

2017: Göttingen, Germany (Participation in real-time MRI study of trombone players at Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry; leader of the trombone research cohort and author of the trombone study protocol)

2017: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio (Chamber music performance)

2017: Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio (Master class)

2016: Sousa Archives and Center for American Music, Champaign, Illinois (Paper presented and demonstration: America’s Slide and Valve Trombone: An Historical Discussion of Sackbuts, Posaunen, Slip Horns, and Much More)

2016: University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois (Master class) 

2016: University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois (Solo performance with Marching Illini Band)

2016: Duke Initiatives in Theology and the Arts, Duke Divinity School, Durham, North Carolina (New Caritas Orchestra performance; Jeremy Begbie)

2016: Augustana University, Sioux Falls, South Dakota (Performances, conductor: Siouxland Trombone Festival)

2016: San Francisco, California and Champaign, Illinois (Performances with Philharmonia Baroque, serpent)

2015: Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas (Performance and master class: Big 12 Trombone Conference)

2015: University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (Performance with University of Washington Wind Ensemble; clinician: Pacific Northwest Band Festival)

2015: Tempe Center for the Arts, Tempe, Arizona (Performance with Tempe Wind Ensemble)

2015: Symphony Hall, Boston, Massachusetts (Performances with Handel and Haydn Society)

2015: New England Conservatory of Music, Boston, Massachusetts (Master class)

2015: Hamamatsu, Japan (Teaching, performance: 21st Hamamatsu International Wind Instrument Academy and Festival)

2015: Hamamatsu, Japan (Lecture and performance: Hamamatsu Museum of Musical Instruments)

2015: Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary, Wake Forest, North Carolina (Conductor: North Carolina Christian School Association All-State Honor Band)

2014: Whitworth University, Spokane, Washington (Performance with Whitworth University Wind Ensemble; master class)

2014: Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York (Performance: International Trombone Festival)

2014: Grace College, Winona Lake, Indiana (Performance, master class: Masterworks Festival)

2014: Hamamatsu, Japan (Teaching, performance: 20th Hamamatsu International Wind Instrument Academy and Festival)

2013: Seattle, Washington (Performance and clinician, Northwest Brass Band Festival)

2013: Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas (Performance, Fort Worth Trombone Summit)

2013: Georgia State University, Columbus, Georgia (Paper presented, Rochut and Friends: How Boston Symphony Orchestra Players Changed the Trombone World; Performance: International Trombone Festival)

2013: Beijing, China (Teaching, performance: Fourth International Trombone and Tuba Festival)

2013: Severance Hall, Cleveland, Ohio (Performances with Cleveland Orchestra)

2013: Cleveland Institute of Music, Cleveland, Ohio (Master class)

2012: Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City (Performance, Second International Historic Brass Festival

2012: Symphony Hall, Phoenix, Arizona (Performances with Phoenix Symphony)

2012: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, Massachusetts (Lecture, demonstration)

2011: Rouen Conservatoire, Rouen, France (Performance and master class)

2011: Paris, France (Paper presented, The English Military Serpent; performance at conference: Le serpent: itinéaires passés et présents)

2011: Yale University (Paper presented, The Serpent in Thomas Hardy’s World and Works, Conference: Hardy at Yale)

2009: Michaelstein, Germany (Paper presented, Haydn and the Serpent; performance at conference: Der Zink – Geschichte, Instrumente und Bauweise)

2008: Amsterdam, Holland (Teaching, performance: Dutch Bass Trombone Open)

2007: Banff Centre, Banff, Canada (Teaching, performance: Banff Summer Brass Seminar)

2004: Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York (Performance: International Trombone Festival)

2014. Recipient of the International Trombone Association’s ITA Award. The ITA Award “recognizes the highest level of creative and artistic output in areas such as performance, composition, arranging, teaching, conducting, research and/or service” and is given to one person each year. The ITA Award was presented at the 43rd International Trombone Festival, held at the Eastman School of Music on June 2014. The award reads: “INTERNATIONAL TROMBONE ASSOCIATION ITA AWARD 2014. Presented to Douglas Yeo in recognition of his distinguished career and in acknowledgment of his impact on the world of trombone performance. Presented by the International Trombone Association Officers, Board of Advisors and Council of Past Presidents.”

ITA Award recipients webpage

2010. Recipient of the International Tuba Euphonium Association’s Clifford Bevan Award for Meritorious Work in Low Brass Scholarship. Presented at the International Tuba Euphonium Conference 2010. The award reads: “The International Tuba Euphonium Association’s Clifford Bevan Award for Meritorious Work in Low Brass Scholarship presented to Douglas Yeo in recognition of exploratory research on low brass and distinguished service with use of the Internet.”

Article on the award in the Summer 2011 issue of the ITEA Journal (PDF format)