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Posted April 27, 2015 by
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We'd like to announce the winners of our first annual paper competition for the Samuel Shellhamer Endowed Award in Urban Studies.

The topic for 2015 was "Mass Incarceration," and students were invited to write position papers responding to the following prompt:

With more than two million people imprisoned in the country, the United States has the highest rate of incarceration in the world. As the prison population of the country has quadrupled since 1980, so have the costs of incarceration, with spending on corrections increasing by 400% during the same period. Moreover, social and cultural costs of mass incarceration are borne disproportionately by the poor, people of color, and the mentally ill. Impoverished urban communities are often hardest hit by this aspect of the U.S. criminal justice system.

What, if anything, should be done about mass incarceration? Should faith-based communities – specifically Christian churches and other organizations – be involved in advocating reform? If so, why and how?

After careful consideration of all entries, CUE has named a winner and two runners up.

First prize goes to Taylor Pride, a senior Urban Studies major, for his paper,  ?Unlocking Mass Incarceration: Offenders, Immigrants and the Role of the Church Taylor will be listed in the 2015 Honors Convocation program as this year's Shellhamer Award recipient and will receive a cash prize of $300.

Two papers tied for second place. ?A Plague of Prisons: Using Public Health to Stop the Spread of Mass Incarcerat by Ian Donahoe, a senior Applied Health Science major, and ??A City for Everybody: Combatting Mass Incarceration through Affordable Housin by Hayley Woodbridge, a junior Urban Studies major. Ian and Hayley will both receive gift boxes from I Have a Bean, a co-sponsor of this year's CUE writing competition.

Many thanks to our judges. CUE Supporting Faculty member  Professor Gregory Lee was joined by  Professor David Iglesias, Director of the Wheaton Center for Faith, Politics and Economics in evaluating this year's papers.

(The Shellhamer Award is named after Dr. Samuel Shellhamer, a former Wheaton College Vice President of Student Development. Dr. Shellhamer was a supporter of the Wheaton in Chicago program who visited the WIC students every semester to learn about their experiences in the city and helped to build bridges between our off-campus program and student development.)

It's an exciting time of year. Every April, while classes are winding down, CUE is gearing up for the fall semester. In the past few weeks, we've been working with our Fall 2015  Wheaton in Chicago cohort to prepare them to make the most of their semester-long immersion experience.

What does this preparation involve? How do we help position our WIC students for a semester of living in and learning from Chicago? Of course there are some practical (like registration) and logistical (like storage) things we need to help with. But there are a number of other things we do to prepare our students for their internships, vocational exploration and discernment, cross-cultural learning, and leadership development.

Here are just a few:

Of course, preparation doesn't end with the end of the spring semester. All of our students also register for URBN 399 Pre-Field Preparation, a 0-credit summer correspondence course in which they'll secure their fall internships and continue to focus on how to use our fall program as a platform for developing cross-cultural competency and engaging in vocational discernment.

So while the spring semester may be coming to an end, this is just the beginning for our fall WIC students. We look forward to working with all of them over the coming months.

We’re excited for the rollout of our new CUE blog and we hope you are, too. We want to give our readers some idea of what we'll be doing here. Posts here at OnCUE will cover a lot of ground. Here’s what you can expect:

OnCUE is an exciting development and an important way for us to connect with our broader audiences on campus and beyond. Check out our first few posts and feel free to let us know what you think.

Posted April 28, 2015 by
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As any professor knows, real life sometimes crashes your party. Events on campus or around the world can require a change of lesson plans. That has been the case in my classes all year. I was teaching courses in Urban Studies during the unrest in Ferguson and the Eric Garner death in New York City. Today, I’ve had to ask myself what questions I would want students in my Chicago course to ask about events in Baltimore. What questions are they now ready to ask and to begin to answer? How has the class prepared students to engage with the death of Freddie Gray and the unfolding protests and riots in the city?

Below are a few brief ideas on teaching the Baltimore riots in my Chicago course.

These will be the leading questions in my class today. This wasn't how I drew up the class session when we started the course in March, but it will help our students to grapple with today's news and to see the connections between what they're learning in class and what goes on beyond our campus.

We'd like to announce the winners of our first annual paper competition for the Samuel Shellhamer Endowed Award in Urban Studies.

The topic for 2015 was "Mass Incarceration," and students were invited to write position papers responding to the following prompt:

With more than two million people imprisoned in the country, the United States has the highest rate of incarceration in the world. As the prison population of the country has quadrupled since 1980, so have the costs of incarceration, with spending on corrections increasing by 400% during the same period. Moreover, social and cultural costs of mass incarceration are borne disproportionately by the poor, people of color, and the mentally ill. Impoverished urban communities are often hardest hit by this aspect of the U.S. criminal justice system.

What, if anything, should be done about mass incarceration? Should faith-based communities – specifically Christian churches and other organizations – be involved in advocating reform? If so, why and how?

After careful consideration of all entries, CUE has named a winner and two runners up.

First prize goes to Taylor Pride, a senior Urban Studies major, for his paper,  ?Unlocking Mass Incarceration: Offenders, Immigrants and the Role of the Church Taylor will be listed in the 2015 Honors Convocation program as this year's Shellhamer Award recipient and will receive a cash prize of $300.

Two papers tied for second place. ?A Plague of Prisons: Using Public Health to Stop the Spread of Mass Incarcerat by Ian Donahoe, a senior Applied Health Science major, and ??A City for Everybody: Combatting Mass Incarceration through Affordable Housin by Hayley Woodbridge, a junior Urban Studies major. Ian and Hayley will both receive gift boxes from I Have a Bean, a co-sponsor of this year's CUE writing competition.

Many thanks to our judges. CUE Supporting Faculty member  Professor Gregory Lee was joined by  Professor David Iglesias, Director of the Wheaton Center for Faith, Politics and Economics in evaluating this year's papers.

(The Shellhamer Award is named after Dr. Samuel Shellhamer, a former Wheaton College Vice President of Student Development. Dr. Shellhamer was a supporter of the Wheaton in Chicago program who visited the WIC students every semester to learn about their experiences in the city and helped to build bridges between our off-campus program and student development.)

It's an exciting time of year. Every April, while classes are winding down, CUE is gearing up for the fall semester. In the past few weeks, we've been working with our Fall 2015  Wheaton in Chicago cohort to prepare them to make the most of their semester-long immersion experience.

What does this preparation involve? How do we help position our WIC students for a semester of living in and learning from Chicago? Of course there are some practical (like registration) and logistical (like storage) things we need to help with. But there are a number of other things we do to prepare our students for their internships, vocational exploration and discernment, cross-cultural learning, and leadership development.

Here are just a few:

Of course, preparation doesn't end with the end of the spring semester. All of our students also register for URBN 399 Pre-Field Preparation, a 0-credit summer correspondence course in which they'll secure their fall internships and continue to focus on how to use our fall program as a platform for developing cross-cultural competency and engaging in vocational discernment.

So while the spring semester may be coming to an end, this is just the beginning for our fall WIC students. We look forward to working with all of them over the coming months.

We’re excited for the rollout of our new CUE blog and we hope you are, too. We want to give our readers some idea of what we'll be doing here. Posts here at OnCUE will cover a lot of ground. Here’s what you can expect:

OnCUE is an exciting development and an important way for us to connect with our broader audiences on campus and beyond. Check out our first few posts and feel free to let us know what you think.