Campus

How Arena Theater Helped Me Find My Tribe

Posted November 2, 2016 by Rebecca Watkins '18

Tags: , , ,



fiddler-on-the-roof
Coming to Wheaton, I was sure that Arena Theater was a community that I was meant to be a part of. As a missionary kid, I have experienced the feeling of having no idea where to call home, but this community of artists has given me that feeling in a real way. We sometimes call it finding your “tribe,” and that is exactly what I have come to find. I chose to participate in Arena Theater because I recognized that it was a tribe of people who truly care for each other, and I was hungry for that.

This year, I am blessed to be a part of Fiddler on the Roof, which is my favorite show. For me, the work is directly applicable to the world and to my life. Being from Ukraine and having experienced similar situations as the characters has opened me up to healing and appreciation for my story and the story of others. I am in the show and work as a props manager and in marketing. It’s a lot to have on my plate, but it is work that I love doing. These people–who I consider to be family–surprise me every day with their work on the show. Mark Lewis’ commitment to playing the main role and directing the show is inspiring. He carries the stories with deep empathy, just like he does with the stories of his students. As we all spend hours learning the choreography, meet about how to make fake cheese, and celebrate tradition together, we are participating in life together, like the village we are representing on stage. 

fiddler-on-the-roof

Again, the teachers in this theater are a wonderful blessing in my life. Michael Stauffer shows me how theater can really heal the evils in the world, Andy Mangin teaches me about how capable I am to do what I have been tasked, Mark Lewis teaches Shakespeare to us willing and hungry students, and Heidi Elliot is a source of constant guidance. This doesn’t even include my fellow students and alumni who I have been guided by as well.

For students thinking about joining Arena Theater, I would like to again emphasize that the tools this program gives you are valuable. You learn how to be an artistic citizen. Whether you join the Workout ensemble, work on the set, take classes, or help with ticket sales, it is all equally valuable and good work. 

fiddler-on-the-roof

Rebecca Watkins ’18 is a communication major with a concentration in theater. To learn more about Arena Theater and upcoming performances, visit their websiteTo learn more about Wheaton, connect with Wheaton College Undergraduate Admissions. Set up a visit, or apply now. Photo captions (top to bottom): Part of the cast of Fiddler on the Roof; Director Mark Lewis as Tevye in Fiddler on the Roof; cast of Fiddler on the Roof eating dinner during a long day of rehearsals. Photos courtesy of Keenan Dava ’18.

How Wheaton College Graduate School is Preparing Me to Work in Student Development

Posted October 12, 2016 by Sarah Sagredo '12, M.A. '18

Tags: , , ,



sarah-sagredo

My decision to apply to Wheaton College Graduate School's Christian Formation and Ministry – Student Development program was heavily influenced by my time living in the dorms and serving as a Resident Assistant as an undergraduate student at Wheaton. Being involved in Residence Life provided me the opportunity to take a broader look into the many ways students are supported outside the classroom. That year I started to consider what it might look like to work in the field higher education in a role where I would be able to walk alongside students during their college experience. 

While I looked into some other schools to continue my education, returning to my alma mater was my first choice. I knew that I would be receiving the highest quality education from professors who cared just as much about my personal and spiritual growth as my educational and professional development. Another important draw was the opportunity I would have to apply for an assistantship where I could gain practical skills and work experience while still in school. 

This year I have the great privilege to serve as the Graduate Student Assistant for the International Student Programs Office. We work to understand and value the unique needs of undergraduate international and third culture students and guide them to holistic success and meaningful engagement with the broader campus community. My primary role this year is to serve as the advisor for Ladder, one of our office’s student organizations. Ladder is a group of 16 international and third culture students who are making intentional connections with their first-year peers to help support them through their transition to Wheaton College. 

What I love most about my work in ISP is the opportunity to build relationships with the truly amazing students who are involved in our office. Though they come from all corners of the globe, their differences do not divide them. Instead, they celebrate the diverse ways that God made them and continues to shape them. They challenge me with their faith, especially their commitment to prayer. Every day they demonstrate to me what it means to be the body of Christ.

sarah-sagredo

Sarah Sagredo '12, M.A. '18 was a biblical studies major at Wheaton and is now a graduate student in the Christian Formation and Ministry – Student Development program. Photo captions (top to bottom): Ladder leaders for 2016-17; Ladder leaders "hanging out" during fall retreat.

Why I Came to Wheaton

Posted October 7, 2016 by Rebecca Carlson '20

Tags: , , ,



carlson-whywheaton

To be honest, Wheaton wasn’t even on my radar when I began to look at colleges. I knew quite a few Wheaton graduates and loved their stories, yet I never considered that Wheaton might be the place for me. When I had crossed off every school from my “prospective list,” Wheaton began to frequently pop up. I would randomly meet people–for example, a new intern at my church–who went there or knew people who went there. I felt prompted to visit.


Immediately upon arrival at Wheaton during my first campus visit in October 2015, I found a loving community, a wonderful tour guide and overnight host, and fantastic classes. Wheaton’s motto, “For Christ and His Kingdom,” spoke to me and what I want my life mission to be. I immediately got the impression that, unlike many other colleges, Wheaton stands behind its faith. Its motto impacts all aspects of life. I knew the search was over. I felt like I belonged, and knew Wheaton was a school where I would be academically challenged and where I could be honest about my religious struggles yet grow fiercely in my faith.

carlson-whywheaton

And now I’m here. I’m almost two months into my freshman year, and I still can’t believe it. Wheaton is incredible. As a public high school graduate, I am still constantly amazed that, through the liberal arts curriculum, I am discussing how biology, elementary education, Spanish, and many other topics are “For Christ and His Kingdom.” There are hard days through the transition that come with moving 15 hours away from home, yet I couldn’t ask for a better community. My floor is incredible, my professors truly want to get to know me and care about my life, and God is good. Everyone here is cheering for one another.

My advice to any prospective students: Trust in God, He knows where you need to go. I hope and pray that Wheaton is the place that He is leading you to, because this is a beautiful place that will support you, love you, and challenge you to lean on the Lord as you grow into the person He created you to be. However, if He is leading you elsewhere, I pray that you will lean on Him throughout your first year because He is our firm foundation.

Blessings.

carlson-whywheaton

Rebecca Carlson ’20 is an elementary education major with an ESL endorsement. To learn more about Wheaton and to apply, visit the undergraduate admissions website. Photo captions (top to bottom): Rebecca’s cabin with Dr. Keith Johnson during the Wheaton Passage program; Rebecca with floormates from Fischer Hall on a bro/sis trip to Chicago; Rebecca and her parents during Orientation Week.

A Warm Welcome to Wheaton from your Student Body President

Posted August 24, 2016 by Josh Rowley '17

Tags: , ,



wheaton-college-student-government-2016-17-honeyrock

If you walk into Lower Beamer this week you are likely to see a lot of new faces–some of them looking very nervous and anxious, others bursting with excitement and anticipation. These faces belong to the 641 new students about to begin an awesome journey here at Wheaton. As I think back about my time here, I can’t help but reflect on the ways in which this community has shaped me and grown me. I wonder though, what will this place be for these new students over the next several years of their lives? As Student Government this year our desire is that Wheaton continues to be a place of growth and encouragement for all of us, from freshmen just beginning to seniors preparing to take the next step in their journeys. 

In each of our lives Wheaton has given us some wonderful years along with some very difficult ones, but through the ups and downs Wheaton has come to be home. The sense of belonging many of us have found here is the driving force behind our desire as Student Government to foster a campus that can truly be called home by all students. It grieves us to know that there are students among us who feel ostracized, excluded, and alone. We want to hear these voices and welcome them in as a part of faithfully living together as brothers and sisters in Christ. 

Additionally, we see at Wheaton a beautiful community composed of individuals from all over the world with a huge diversity of perspectives and experiences. We are excited to delve into our differences as a campus, knowing that doing so will necessitate working through some hard issues. We realize that we will never attain perfect community together on this earth, but we sincerely desire another year of growth at Wheaton with the hopes of seeing a small glimpse of our eternal community. 

Finally, we are seeking to promote excellence in our academic and vocational pursuits at Wheaton. We are blessed to be studying at one of a select few institutions that has maintained its Christian foundation while continuing to offer highly-regarded academics. We believe that continuing to prepare well for life beyond the doors of Wheaton is an important part of our calling to go out into the world and serve Christ. 

It has been a privilege and blessing to begin working with my Vice President Elizabeth Tilley ’17, and the 15 members of our board. It is clear that the Lord has assembled a group of students who care deeply about our student body and whose life experiences have equipped them to serve our campus well this year. I am so excited for this year that we have together and trust that the Lord has great things in store for each of your lives and our campus. 

Josh Rowley ’17 is a senior economics major and Student Body President at Wheaton. Elizabeth Tilley ’17 is a senior math and secondary education major and Student Body Vice President. Photo caption: 2016-17 Student Government gathers at HoneyRock in August 2016. Top row (l to r): Brent Westergren, Ted Cockle, Emily Taetzsch, Audrey Gross, Jack McHenney, Elizabeth Tilley, Mady Reno, Alex Kuo, Charisa Fort, Rachel Lies. Bottom row: Simona Andreas, Josh Rowley, Caleb Guerrero, Matt Anderson, Jackie Westeren, Sade Bammimore. Not in photo: Alouette Greenidge, Michael Liu.

Wheaton in Washington

Posted June 22, 2016 by Kristen Hermes '17

Tags: , , ,



Washington-one

“Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.” – President Barack Obama 

Each one of us desires to do something meaningful with our lives, something that will make a difference. We see the brokenness in the world and wonder what we can do that will make terrible situations better. While the goal of the Wheaton in Washington program was not to give students all of the answers to life’s hard questions, it did show students different ways in which they could work towards change in the world through various careers. 

The first two weeks of the program were spent in the classroom discussing topics of special concern, including the 2016 presidential election, the Syrian refugee crisis, mass incarceration, and religion in politics. During this time, we wrestled with the aforementioned topics and were forced to think more deeply about issues while hearing new perspectives from our fellow classmates. After our initial classroom sessions, we traveled to Washington D.C. to meet individuals who are actively involved in making a difference in social justice issues. 

One of the most exciting parts of the program was during the first week in D.C. when we were given a tour of the Pentagon. Being inside the Pentagon and talking with Wheaton alumnus Peter Cairns who works there was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. I will not soon forget our Pentagon visit as it reminded me that Wheaton students and alumni go on to do extraordinary things. I would encourage anyone who desires to work in politics, or simply see how change actually can come out of government, to participate in the Wheaton in Washington Program. 

washingtonwheaton

Overall, Wheaton in Washington was special to me because I am a rising junior who is constantly thinking about how to make my future career meaningful. This experience allowed me to see all the different areas in which I can work in politics, and more importantly, how working in any of these political jobs can help create small but positive changes in the world. 

Kristen Hermes ’17 is a political science major and participant in the 2016 Wheaton in Washington program. To learn more about the program, visit Wheaton in Washington website

Photo Captions (from top): Wheaton in Washington participants Camila Moreno '19, Lauren Rowley '19, Laurel Nee '19, Amanda Wade '19, and Lydia Granger '19 enjoy a restful moment between meetings on the lawn of the Capitol building, photo credit Skyler Hein '19; Wheaton in Washington participants in front of the White House. Row 1 (l to r): Amanda Wade '19, Skyler Hein '19, Phil Kline '17, Madylin Reno '19, Emily Hillstrom '17, Lauren Rowley '19, Kristen Hermes '17, Emily Fromke '19, and Thea Boatwright '19. Row 2 (l to r): Laurel Nee '19, Gabriella Siefert '19, Lydia Granger '19, Will Lauderdale '19, David Criscione '18, and James Dingwall '18.

Media Center