B.B. Warfield

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Benjamin B. Warfield (1851-1921), Presbyterian minister, theologian and editor, was born near Lexington, Kentucky. Educated at Princeton and Princeton Theological Seminary under Charles Hodge, Warfield embraced modern scholarship to support Calvinist theology, defend the authority of the Bible and refute liberal teaching on Christianity.

A polemicist who developed a rigorous apologetic for Scripture, Warfield believed examining biblical data would bolster the biblical worldview. Warfield’s published works, including monographs, reviews and articles for religious journals and the press, are collected in a ten-volume series of Works (1927-1932). After Archibald Hodge’s death in 1887, Warfield succeeded him as professor of theology at Princeton Theological Seminary where he served until his death. Along with Charles and Archibald Hodge, Warfield was a significant contributor to the school of thought known as Princeton Theology.

For further reading see Mark A. Noll, Princeton Theology, 1812-1921 (Baker, 1983). 

Benjamin B. Warfield (1851-1921), Presbyterian minister, theologian and editor, was born near Lexington, Kentucky. Educated at Princeton and Princeton Theological Seminary under Charles Hodge, Warfield embraced modern scholarship to support Calvinist theology, defend the authority of the Bible and refute liberal teaching on Christianity.

A polemicist who developed a rigorous apologetic for Scripture, Warfield believed examining biblical data would bolster the biblical worldview. Warfield’s published works, including monographs, reviews and articles for religious journals and the press, are collected in a ten-volume series of Works (1927-1932). After Archibald Hodge’s death in 1887, Warfield succeeded him as professor of theology at Princeton Theological Seminary where he served until his death. Along with Charles and Archibald Hodge, Warfield was a significant contributor to the school of thought known as Princeton Theology.

For further reading see Mark A. Noll, Princeton Theology, 1812-1921 (Baker, 1983).