Mark Jonas, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Education
On Faculty since 2013

Phone: (630)752-5763
Email:

Education

Ph.D., Philosophy and Education, Teachers College, Columbia University, New York, NY, 2009

M.A, Teaching, University of Portland, Portland, OR, 2002

B.A. Philosophy, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 1999

About Mark Jonas

Dr. Jonas’s goal in teaching future teachers is not to provide a single authorized method of teaching, but to encourage students to cultivate just lives and a liberating, authentic, and dynamic classroom practice. Dr. Jonas uses philosophical texts and discussions to cultivate certain attitudes and habits of mind in students, which open the possibility for right living and powerful teaching. By placing students in dialectical relationship with texts, with ideas, and with one another, students learn how to dialogue with themselves, while simultaneously learning how best to develop, evaluate and deploy effective classroom practices.

Dr. Jonas’s research functions similarly. By examining the ideas of philosophers who intended to transform their readers through their writings—like Plato, Rousseau and Nietzsche, for example—Dr. Jonas draws his readers into dialogue with these thinkers, encouraging his readers to rethink their own conceptions of justice, virtue, beauty, education and so on.

Research Interests

  • Philosophy of Education
  • Political Philosophy
  • The Philosophy of Nietzsche
  • The Philosophy of Rousseau
  • The Philosophy of Plato
  • American Educational and Political Thought

Publications and Presentations

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • “Education for Epiphany: The Case of Plato's Lysis.” Educational Theory (forthcoming)
  • “Fichte, Freedom and Dogmatism.” Journal of Idealistic Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Overcoming Ressentiment: Nietzsche’s Education for an Aesthetic Aristocracy.” History of Political Thought, Vol. 34, no. 4 (2013), pp. 669-701
  • “Appetite, Reason, and Education in Socrates’ ‘City of Pigs.’” Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy, Vol. 57, no. 4 (2012), pp. 332-357. This article was co-written by Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa and James Braun who are the second and third authors respectively
  • “Gratitude, Ressentiment, and Citizenship Education.” Studies in Philosophy and Education, vol. 31, no. 1 (2012), pp. 29-46
  • “Dewey’s Conception of Interest and its Significance for Teacher Education.” Educational Philosophy and Theory, vol. 43, no. 2 (2011), pp. 112-129
  • “When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.” Journal of Philosophy of Education, vol. 44, no. 1 (2010), pp. 45-60
  • “A (R)evaluation of Nietzsche’s Anti-democratic Pedagogy: The Overman, Perspectivism and Self-overcoming.” Studies in Philosophy and Education, vol. 28, no. 2 (2009), pp. 153-169
  • “Finding Truth in ‘Lies’: Nietzsche’s Perspectivism and its Relation to Education.” Journal of Philosophy of Education, vol. 42, no. 2 (2008), pp. 270-285. This article was co-written by Yoshiaki M. Nakazawa who is the second author on the publication

Book Chapters

  • “The Social Significance of Egoism and Perfectionism: Nietzsche's Education for the Public Good,” in The Relevance of Higher Education, edited by Timothy Simpson, Landham, MA: Lexington Books (September, 2013)

Invited Articles

  • “Power, Disability, and Democracy.” Philosophy of Education, (2010)

Selected Refereed Conference Presentations

  • “A Platonic Conception of Character Education.” Ohio Valley Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, Dayton, OH, September 2014
  • Aporia, Revelation and the Socratic Method: What Contemporary Educators Can Learn from Plato's Lysis.” Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Annual Meeting, Oxford, UK, March, 2014
  • “Dewey and Aristotle on Education, Happiness and Factory Work.” American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, April, 2013
  • “Rousseau’s Apolitical Prescription for Happiness: Virtue, Self-Mastery and Sexual Differentiation in the Educations of Sophie and Emile.” Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Annual Meeting, Oxford, UK, March, 2013
  • “On Boredom, Apathy and Disengagement in Education,” Ohio Valley Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, Dayton, OH, September, 2012
  • “Educating the Self and Others: Nietzsche’s Education for the Common Good.” Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Annual Meeting, Oxford, UK, March, 2012
  • “Imagination in the Philosophy Class: A Response to Richard Rorty.” American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, Vancouver, BC, April 2012
  • “Gratitude, Ressentiment, and Civic Education.” Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain Annual Meeting, Oxford, UK, April, 2011
  •  “Gratitude, Democratic Education, and the Eternal Recurrence.” American  Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, April, 2011
  • “Enlightenment, Education, and the Socratic Method: Reconsidering Plato’s ‘City of Pigs.’ Ohio Valley Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, Dayton, OH, September, 2010
  • “Can We Learn from Rousseau’s Sexism: Self-Mastery and the Education of Sophie and Emile.”  American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, Denver, CO, May 2010
  • “Power, Disability, and Democracy.” Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, San Francisco, CA, April, 2010
  • “When Teachers Must Let Education Hurt: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Compassion and the Educational Value of Suffering.” Ohio Valley Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, Dayton, OH, September 2009
  • “Teaching Dewey’s Conception of Interest and Effort in Teacher Education Programs: A Theoretical Approach.” American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, April 2009
  • “A Response to McCarthy and Nakazawa: On Aesthetic Education, Heroes and Fashion.” Graduate Student Conference in Philosophy of Education, New York, NY, October, 2008
  •  “Educating the Self and Others: Nietzsche’s Education for the Common Good.” Ohio Valley  Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting, Dayton OH, September 2008 
  • “Dissent, Criticism and Democracy in Schools.” Philosophy of Education Society Annual Meeting,  Cambridge, MA, April 2008
  • “Is Nietzsche Anti-Democratic? A Re-Evaluation of Self-Overcoming and the Democratic  Classroom.” American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting, New York, NY, March 2008
  • “A More Robust Concept of Imagination: Coleridge in the Classroom?” Fifth Annual Imagination  and Education Conference, Vancouver, BC, July 2007
  • “Hurting in Order to Help: Rousseau and Nietzsche on Pity and Self-Mastery.” Philosophy of  Education Society Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA, March 2007
  • “Rethinking Reason in America’s High Schools: An Imaginative Response to John Dewey and the  Problem of Modern Rationality.” Redemption of Reason Conference, Chicago, IL, October 2005

Invited Presentations

  • “How to Inspire Your Students to Want to Learn Without Really Trying…Well, Maybe You’ll Have to Try a Little Bit.” University of Portland, April, 2012
  • “The Social Relevance of Egoism and Perfectionism: Nietzsche’ Education for the Public Good.” Adron Doran Symposium, Morehead, KY, May 2012

 

 

 

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