Matthew S. Harmon, Ph.D. 2006

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Matthew S. HarmonRecipient of the Dr. Kenneth Kantzer Fellowship established by the class of 1953

Professor of New Testament Studies
Grace Theological Seminary; Winona Lake, IN

 

My dissertation was entitled "She Must and Shall Go Free: Paul's Isaianic Gospel in Galatians" (Walter de Gruyter >>) and was supervised by Dr. Douglas Moo. I explored how Paul's reading of Isaiah (esp. chs. 49-54) shaped his argument and theology in Galatians. The joy of this dissertation was the opportunity to blend several of my research interests (OT in NT, biblical theology, Pauline studies).

My three years in the Wheaton Ph.D. program were a rich blend of spiritual growth, academic challenge and learning in community. The reduced course work combined with an immediate emphasis on dissertation research expanded both the breadth and depth of my knowledge not only in my specialty of New Testament, but across the span of theological disciplines. The constant interaction with world-class faculty and my fellow students in the program deepened my understanding of God, His purposes in the world and how the academy can serve the church in advancing Christ's kingdom. If you are looking for a Ph.D. program that will prepare you for a lifetime of ministry within the academy and the church, I can think of no better place than Wheaton.

Matthew S. HarmonRecipient of the Dr. Kenneth Kantzer Fellowship established by the class of 1953

Professor of New Testament Studies
Grace Theological Seminary; Winona Lake, IN

 

My dissertation was entitled "She Must and Shall Go Free: Paul's Isaianic Gospel in Galatians" (Walter de Gruyter >>) and was supervised by Dr. Douglas Moo. I explored how Paul's reading of Isaiah (esp. chs. 49-54) shaped his argument and theology in Galatians. The joy of this dissertation was the opportunity to blend several of my research interests (OT in NT, biblical theology, Pauline studies).

My three years in the Wheaton Ph.D. program were a rich blend of spiritual growth, academic challenge and learning in community. The reduced course work combined with an immediate emphasis on dissertation research expanded both the breadth and depth of my knowledge not only in my specialty of New Testament, but across the span of theological disciplines. The constant interaction with world-class faculty and my fellow students in the program deepened my understanding of God, His purposes in the world and how the academy can serve the church in advancing Christ's kingdom. If you are looking for a Ph.D. program that will prepare you for a lifetime of ministry within the academy and the church, I can think of no better place than Wheaton.