Charlie Trimm, Ph.D. 2012

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Recipient of the Mina Marie Johnson Fellowship

Asst. Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies

Talbot School of Theology, La Mirada, CA 

My dissertation was entitled “‘YHWH Fights for Them!’: The Divine Warrior in the Exodus Narrative” (supervised by Dr. Daniel I. Block). In recent years many scholars have studied the divine warrior motif in the Old Testament, but the vast majority of the attention has focused on poetic texts. My work sought to extend the study of the divine warrior into a narrative text (the exodus narrative), since the poetic texts tend to be laconic and lack background information. Not only would this study broaden our understanding of the divine warrior motif, but it would also provide new interpretive lenses to help us read the exodus narrative more clearly.

Wheaton College was an amazing place to study for my doctorate. The small cohort size encouraged friendship with my fellow students rather than competition, and we were able to enjoy many fascinating discussions across disciplines and theological boundaries. The scholarship allowed me to focus on my studies without distractions and finish much more quickly than I would have in other schools. The Christian context of the program consistently reminded us that our studies were not purely academic, but done for the glory of God and for the edification of the church. The best part of the program for me was the opportunity to work with Daniel Block, who never ceased to challenge me academically and spiritually.

Recipient of the Mina Marie Johnson Fellowship

Asst. Professor of Biblical and Theological Studies

Talbot School of Theology, La Mirada, CA 

My dissertation was entitled “‘YHWH Fights for Them!’: The Divine Warrior in the Exodus Narrative” (supervised by Dr. Daniel I. Block). In recent years many scholars have studied the divine warrior motif in the Old Testament, but the vast majority of the attention has focused on poetic texts. My work sought to extend the study of the divine warrior into a narrative text (the exodus narrative), since the poetic texts tend to be laconic and lack background information. Not only would this study broaden our understanding of the divine warrior motif, but it would also provide new interpretive lenses to help us read the exodus narrative more clearly.

Wheaton College was an amazing place to study for my doctorate. The small cohort size encouraged friendship with my fellow students rather than competition, and we were able to enjoy many fascinating discussions across disciplines and theological boundaries. The scholarship allowed me to focus on my studies without distractions and finish much more quickly than I would have in other schools. The Christian context of the program consistently reminded us that our studies were not purely academic, but done for the glory of God and for the edification of the church. The best part of the program for me was the opportunity to work with Daniel Block, who never ceased to challenge me academically and spiritually.