Mark Thorne, Ph.D.

Ancient Languages

Assistant Professor of Classical Languages
On Faculty since 2008

Office: WYN 205
Phone: (630)752-5631
Email:

Education

Ph.D. in Classics, University of Iowa, 2010

Dissertation: "Lucan's Cato, the Subversion of Victory, and the Triumph of Memory"

M.A. in Classics, University of Iowa, 2002 

B.A. in Antiquities, Missouri State University, 2000

About Mark Thorne

Simply put, I am addicted to finding out where things come from! In order for us to make sense of the present, we need an understanding of the past, and the study of ancient Greece and Rome is one of the best ways to understand this modern world, because it reveals the ethical, linguistic, political, and religious foundations upon which Western Civilization has been built. I never cease to be amazed at how useful and relevant a knowledge of the ancient world constantly proves to be! This is true for anybody but especially so for the Christian who wants to engage meaningfully with culture.

Membership in Professional Societies

  • American Philological Association (APA)
  • Classical Association of the Middle West and South (CAMWS)
  • American Classical League (ACL)
  • Classical Association of Canada (CAC)

Research

  • Ancient Epic, particularly Lucan’s Bellum Civile (epic on the civil war fought between Julius Caesar and Pompey at the end of the Roman Republic)
  • Memory and memorials in ancient Greece and Rome
  • Civil War narratives (ranging from the ancient world to modern times)
  • Latin poetry
  • Ancient Hymns
  • Greek and Latin pedagogy

Papers Published and/or Presented

Publications: 

“Memoria Redux: Memory in Lucan,” chapter in Brill Companion to Lucan (forthcoming 2009) 

Conference Papers & Workshops: 

Disce Ut Doceas: Preparing to be a TA in Latin (CAMWS 2008, ACL 2006, 2007, 2008)

“Exempla Mala: The Crisis of Memory in Lucan” (CAMWS 2007)

“The Unity of Lucan’s Proem (1.1–66)” (CAC 2006)

“The Defeat of Victory in Book 1 of Lucan’s Bellum Civile” (CAMWS 2006)

“To Surrender or Not: Structure and Meaning in the 4th Book of Lucan’s Civil War” (CAC 2005)

“Divided We Fall: A Programmatic Function of Thucydides' Acarnanian Campaign (2.80-92)” (CAMWS 2005)

“The Aristeia and the Poetics of Epic Failure in Book Nine of Vergil's Aeneid” (APA 2005)

“Apollo’s Roadmap: a Geographical Allusion to Hymns and Homonoia (Argonautica 2.674–5)” (CAMWS 2003)

“Cato and the Snakes in Lucan: Whose aristeia Is It Anyway? (Pharsalia 9.700–889)” (APA 2003)

“The ‘Misfired’ Epiphanies of Apollo in Apollonius’ Argonautica” (CAMWS 2002)